42 Worrying Workplace Stress Statistics

Stress Management

Effects of Stress in the Workplace statistics

20. During 2018, 76% of US workers said that workplace stress affected their personal relationships.

(Korn Ferry)

This is another statistic that demonstrates just how much workplace stress affects other areas of our life. According to research by Korn Ferry, the majority of stressed employees reported that workplace stress has impacted upon their personal relationships in a negative manner.

21. Stress caused sleep deprivation for 66% of American workers in 2018.

(Korn Ferry)

It goes without saying that stress impacts health. Two-thirds of respondents involved in Korn Ferry’s study said they had trouble sleeping as a consequence of work-related stress. Mental health in the workplace statistics clearly show that this reduces worker productivity and leads to even more stress.

22. 16% of workers have quit their jobs due to stress.

(Korn Ferry)

Increasing amounts of stress create unbearable working conditions for some. Almost every one in six workers (16%) has quit a job as a result of work-related stress.

23. 60% of workers have left a job or would leave one over a bad boss.

(Randstad USA)

As we’ve already mentioned, bosses are the main source of stress at work. When we look at the stress statistics in the workplace provided by Randstad USA, we can see that over half of workers have already quit or would quit their job if they had a bad boss.

24. 31% of surveyed US workers said that being unclear about expectations from supervisors is the most stressful element when experiencing change at work.

(Chicago Tribune)

Of 2,000 respondents who participated in the survey, 620 (31%) said that not being clear about expectations from upper management is the most stressful aspect of undergoing changes at their workplace. Once again, stress workplace statistics confirm that management-worker relations seem to be one of the most prominent factors for workplace stress.

25. Around 46% of workers are considering joining the gig economy in 2019.

(Randstad USA)

The gig economy is on the rise. Nowadays, more and more workers prefer to work independently, be their own boss, and determine their own schedule. With this in mind, it’s no surprise that a considerable number of workers want to switch over to the gig economy in order to reduce their work-related stress. Randstad USA’s statistics about stress in the workplace reveal that almost half (46%) of surveyed workers are considering switching over to the gig economy during 2019.

26. Workers say that stress and anxiety affect their work productivity and coworker relations more than any other factor.

(ADAA)

One of the most comprehensive surveys concerning stress and anxiety in the workplace comes from the ADAA (Anxiety and Depression Association of America). According to workplace productivity statistics from the ADAA, workers identify workplace productivity (56%) and relationships with coworkers and peers (51%) as being affected the most by stress and anxiety.

27. 51% of US workers are mentally “checked out” at work.

(Gallup)

Gallup’s State of the American Workplace survey looked at how engaged US workers are in the workplace. The study found more than 50% of workers are not engaged at work as a result of stress, leading to a loss of productivity.

28. 41% of stressed workers say stress leads to a loss in productivity.

(Colonial Life)

Stress negatively impacts how we perform and function both in the workplace and in our daily lives. As a recent survey conducted by Colonial Life shows, 41% of workers say stress has caused a drop in work productivity. Furthermore, stress statistics in the workplace also reveal that a third of surveyed employees say stress leads to lower engagement levels at work, while 15% say increasing pressure at work has pushed them into looking for other jobs.

29. Over a quarter of employees are at risk of burning out in the next 12 months.

(Wrike)

Being under stress for prolonged periods of time can have serious consequences. It sometimes leads to burnout, when someone reaches a tipping point where he or she is unable to work at all. Burning out doesn’t only affect people’s work; it can also lead to serious mental health issues. According to Wrike’s 2019 US workplace stress statistics, if current stress levels don’t change, more than a third of stressed office workers feel they will burn out in the next 12 months.

30. Women are more likely to handle stress by eating more (46%) and talking with family and friends (44%), while men are more likely to have sex more frequently (19%) and use illicit drugs (12%).

(ADAA)

There are significant differences in how men and women manage stress at the workplace. Women tend to eat more (46% of women compared to 27% of men) and talk with friends and family (44% compared to 21%). On the other hand, men are more likely to have sex more frequently (19% compared to 10%), while 12% of men cope by using illicit drugs, compared to only 2% of women.

31. Both men and women handle stress by consuming more caffeine (31%), smoking (27%), and exercising more frequently (25%).

(ADAA)

With ever-increasing levels of stress, it’s important to look at how we manage when things get tough. As these statistics on workplace stress by the ADAA suggest, the genders have some things in common when it comes to handling stress, although it’s fair to say these aren’t always the healthiest methods. The most common methods are consuming more caffeine (31%), followed by smoking (27%) and exercise (25%).

32. Only 40% of employees who suffer from stress have talked to their employer about it.

(ADAA)

Statistics for stress in the workplace tell us that most workers don’t feel comfortable reporting stress-related problems at work. Less than half of surveyed employees have told their employers about the work-related stress they’re experiencing.

33. 34% of workers don’t feel safe reporting stress because they think it would be interpreted as a lack of interest or unwillingness to do the activity.

(ADAA)

There are several reasons why workers don’t talk about stress with their employers. The most prominent one is that they think it will be interpreted as a lack of interest or unwillingness to do the activity (34%), followed by fear of being “weak” (31%), then because they worry it will affect promotion opportunities (22%).

34. Only four in 10 workers who report stress to their employer are offered some kind of help.

(ADAA)

When workers do end up asking for help, the response they receive is not great. Statistics on US stress in the workplace say only 40% of employees are offered help by their employers. Usually, this help consists of being referred to a mental health professional (26%) or being offered a stress-management class (22%).

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